Software Legos

I have been programming for over 20 years now. The year I learned to program (in Fortran) was the last year the university had punch cards. By the next semester I was using a line printer and the next year a CRT. Only two years later I had purchased an Apple ][, although I was mainly working on minicomputers. (If you are too young to remember, they actually used to break things down as micro, mini and mainframe. There were never any maxi-computers, just super ones.)

SSI, CGI and PERL, Oh My!

Will the wonders of the world wide web ever cease? There are a lot of things about web technology that just don’t make a lot of sense. A lot of unixisms show through like a bad one-coat paint job. (And not everything about unix “makes sense” either. It’s just the way things are done. After all, the internet is a unix legacy.) What many people seem to love about the web is the way all these different technologies can work together to achieve results. My pet peeve is the way they don’t work together.

A Subversive Update

Well, the nightmare continues. I decided to try an Apache2 setup on my server. But using DarwinPorts I was unable to get subversion to build the mod_dav_svn. It wouldn’t put it into the already installed Apache2 server in /opt. I tried all the variants including building a DarwinPorts Apache2 installation. In the end, I decided to look at Fink which I haven’t tried in years.

Learning To Cascade

I like to learn new things and when I started trying to change the look of my blog I realized I needed to learn CSS. Up until now I’ve viewed html and CSS as sort of a output language for tools such as Dreamweaver or GoLive. I figured if I ever was asked to write such a tool then I would learn it just as I learned Postscript once when I was writing some printing routines for a software application I was authoring. Well, I’m in the middle of learning CSS right mow.

Subversive thoughts

I was bringing up subversion on my server. I used DarwinPorts to do the install on both my personal machine and the server. Ports seemed easier to me than my past experiences with Fink, but Fink does allow you to update all your installed software with just a few commands. DarwinPorts makes you do it package by package. But I am beginning to think that given how easily unix software breaks, I’d rather do my upgrades one at a time.

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